10.1 Introduction

10.1.1 Whakatupuranga Waikato-Tainui 2050 is the blueprint for cultural, social and economic advancement for Waikato-Tainui people. It is a long-term development approach to building the capacity of Waikato-Tainui marae, hapuu, and iwi. Whakatupuranga 2050 will be our legacy for those who come after us.

10.1.2 In the changing global environment the world our future generations live in will be significantly different to ours. So our approach for moving forward is one that embraces change and focuses on developing our people. With this in mind, there are three critical elements fundamental to equipping our generations with the capacity to shape their own future:

(a) A pride and commitment to uphold their tribal identity and integrity;

(b) A diligence to succeed in education and beyond; and

(c) A self-determination for socio-economic independence.

10.1.3 The first element recognises the importance of our tribal history, maatauranga, reo and tikanga. With a secure sense of identity and cultural integrity, our future generations will be proud and confident in all walks of life. Creating a culture for success generates opportunities and choices. Hence the focus of the second element is to promote a diligence among tribal members of all ages to pursue success in all their endeavours. This enables personal growth, contributes to building the capacity of our people, and provides opportunities to utilise that growth and capacity for the collective benefit of our marae, hapuu, and iwi.

10.1.4 Determination to develop and grow our tribal assets is the focus of the third element. This is consistent with the time honoured vision we inherited from Kiingi Taawhiao “Maaku anoo e hanga tooku nei whare…” – to build our own house in order to face the challenges of the future; and including our Mission “Kia tupu, kia hua, kia puaawai” – to grow, prosper and sustain.

10.1.5 Underpinning the Values that shape us as a people, are the unifying ‘Principles of Kiingitanga.’

10.2 Strategic Direction

10.2.1 The Strategic Direction of “Whakatupuranga Waikato-Tainui 2050” is the primary motivating force to achieving all our tribal aspirations.

TE WHAKAKITENGA – Vision

Maaku anoo e hanga tooku nei whare
Ko ngaa pou oo roto he maahoe, he patete
Ko te taahuhu, he hiinau
Me whakatupu ki te hua o te rengarenga
Me whakapakari ki te hua o te kawariki

I shall fashion my own house
The support posts shall be of maahoe, patete
The ridgepole of hiinau
The inhabitants shall be raised on rengarenga
and nurtured on kawariki

Kiingi Taawhiao

Kia tupu he iwi whai hua, whai ora, whai tikanga, taakiri ngaakau, taakiri hinengaro
To grow a prosperous, healthy, vibrant, innovative and culturally strong iwi

10.2.2 NGAA TIKANGA – Values Underpinned by the unifying Principles of Kiingitanga

Whakaiti – Humility
Whakapono – Trust and Faith
Aroha – Love and Respect
Rangimaarie – Peace and Calm
Manaakitanga – Caring
Kotahitanga – Unity
Mahitahi – Collaboration

10.2.3 TE AHUNGA – Mission

Kia tupu, kia hua, kia puaawai
To grow, prosper and sustain

10.2.4 NGAA WHAAINGA MATUA – Primary Goals

Kia tiaki i te Kiingitanga
Kia mau ngaa taonga tuku iho
Kia eke ki ngaa taumata tiketike
Kia whai i too taatou mana motuhake

10.3 Strategic Objectives

10.3.1 KIINGITANGA

“Whaaia Ko Te Mana Motuhake”

10.3.1.1 The King Movement is the unifying korowai of Maaori. Kiingitanga was established in 1858 to unite all tribes under the leadership of Pootatau Te Wherowhero. Its primary goals were to cease the sale of land to Paakehaa, stop inter-tribal warfare, and provide a springboard for the preservation of Maaori culture in the face of Paakehaa colonisation. As it
has done for the past 150 years, the role of Kiingitanga will still be the unifying thread of all Iwi, under the seventh monarch, Kiingi Tuheitia.

(a) To retain our historical role as Kaitiaki o te Kiingitanga

(b) To ensure Kiingitanga remains an eternal symbol of unity

10.3.2 TRIBAL IDENTITY AND INTEGRITY

“Ko Tainui te waka, ko Taupiri te maunga, ko Waikato te awa, ko Pootatau te taangata, Waikato taniwha rau, he piko he taniwha, he piko he taniwha”

10.3.2.1 Our strategic direction charts a course of significant developments to protect our tribal identity and integrity. The development of a core strategy designed to provide maximum support for our kaumaatua, the caretakers of our maatauranga, and experts of our reo and tikanga, is a key priority. Our whenua, rivers, lakes and other waterways are living embodiments of our tribal identity. The necessity to forge a partnership with the Crown is vital to the preservation and protection of ’te taiao’, our environment.

(a) To preserve our tribal heritage, reo and tikanga

(b) To grow our tribal estate and manage our natural resources

10.3.3 TRIBAL SUCCESS

“Ki te moemoeaa ahau ko ahau anake; ki te moemoeaa taatou ka taea e taatou”

10.3.3.1 Priorities in this context are focused on building capacity in all our endeavours at all levels. Coupled with research as a key priority to keep the tribe abreast of all local and global shifts and developments, generations hereafter will be well equipped to enjoy success in all sectors of society. There is recognition however, that success is short term without succession, so growing leaders through succession planning and mentoring programmes are key priorities.

(a) To succeed in all forms of education and training

(b) To be global leaders in research excellence

(c) To grow leaders

10.3.4 TRIBAL SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC WELLBEING

“Kia niwha te ngaakau ki te whakauu, ki te atawhai i te iwi”

10.3.4.1 Priorities in this context are focused on building capacity in all our endeavours at all levels. Coupled with research as a key priority to keep the tribe abreast of all local and global shifts and developments, generations hereafter will be well equipped to enjoy success in all sectors of society. Here is recognition however, that success is short term without succession, so growing leaders through succession planning and mentoring programmes are key priorities.

(a) To develop self-sufficient marae

(b) To advance the social development of our people

(c) To develop and sustain our economic capacity

10.4 Issues

Collaboration and consistency

10.4.1 For Waikato-Tainui, the health and wellbeing of the environment is inseparable from the social, cultural, spiritual, economic, and environmental health and wellbeing of taangata whenua. Therefore resource management, use and activities have the ability to significantly impact on the achievement of Whakatupuranga 2050. Waikato-Tainui is not, relatively speaking, a significant resource manager, user, or activity operator within its rohe, though this is expected to increase. Therefore, Waikato-Tainui is well aware that the achievement of Whakatupuranga 2050 requires, amongst other things, collaboration with the wider community.

10.4.2 If resource management, use and activities are inconsistent with Whakatupuranga 2050, resource users or activity operators risk undermining the ability of Whakatupuranga 2050 to be achieved. It is critical that, where at all possible, resource management, use and activities will occur yet be consistent with Whakatupuranga 2050 and, ideally, contributes to the achievement of Whakatupuranga 2050.

10.5 Objectives, Policies & Methods

Objective – collaboration and consistency

10.5.1 Resource management, use and activities within the Waikato-Tainui rohe are consistent with the vision, mission, values and strategic objectives of Whakatupuranga 2050.

Policy – collaboration and consistency

10.5.1.1 To ensure that resource management, use and activities within the Waikato-Tainui rohe are consistent with the vision, mission, values and strategic objectives of Whakatupuranga 2050.

Methods

(a) Resource management, use, and activities are consistent with Whakatupuranga 2050.

(b) Resource management, use and activities are encouraged, where practical and possible, to contribute to the achievement of Whakatupuranga 2050.

(c) Resource users and activity operators collaborate with Waikato-Tainui consistent with Chapter 6, ‘Te koorero tahi me Waikato-Tainui (Consultation and engagement with Waikato-Tainui)’ to check the consistency and contribution of their proposed resource management, use, or activity to the achievement of Whakatupuranga 2050.